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2015-16 Dean’s Report: Looking back on a great year

The 2015-16 Dean’s Report has just been sent to print and will be available both in print and online in the new year. The report serves as a retrospective on the year we’ve had and is full of successes across our three schools. In the interest of giving you a sneak peak, the following are my opening remarks, with mention of some of the stories that you’ll see highlighted in this year’s report.

Building empathy through the First Patient program

One of the most unique aspects of undergraduate medicine curriculum is the First Patient Program. It offers students the opportunity to experience the healthcare process with a real patient; from the very beginning of their academic journeys.

Transforming medical education through diversity

In the fall of 2014, Dr. Mala Joneja was appointed to a brand new role in the School of Medicine: Director of Diversity and Equity. Dr. Joneja studied medicine here at Queen’s, completed her postgraduate training in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology at Western University and earned a Master of Education degree in Health Professions Education (theory and policy studies) from OISE, University of Toronto.

Stephen Archer earns top honour in heart research

This past week, Dr. Stephen Archer travelled to New Orleans to accept a very special honour from one of the world’s most important organizations for cardiovascular health and research: he received the Distinguished Scientist Award from the American Heart Association.

Competency Based Medical Education at Queen’s: Change FOR us, BY Us

Guest blog by Dr. Jena Hall, PGY 2/CIP Obstetrics and Gynecology, on behalf of the CBME Resident Subcommittee

For some time, there has been a buzz around Competency Based Medical Education (CBME) at Queen’s – that it’s coming soon, it means more assessment, and potentially shorter residencies? … Let’s look at the facts.

The Poet of My Generation Wins the Nobel Prize

Each year I have the privilege of addressing the first year class the day they start medical school. I try to give them a sense of the quality of the medical school they are joining, the rigors that the next four years will bring, and the marvelous opportunities a career in medicine provides. I emphasize that I want them to be restless, to pay attention to the important roles physicians play in our society, and to strive to be involved in our health care system. Most importantly, I tell them that it’s critically important that they strive to do something special.

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