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Transforming research in Lyme disease

In the last few years, Canada has witnessed a surge in cases of Lyme disease. “In 2015, there were 700 new cases of Lyme disease reported to the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), up from 140 cases in 2009. Lyme is now being diagnosed in southern B.C., Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick.”1

Lyme disease is caused by a bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, which is transmitted to people and animals through tick bites. Ticks are small arachnids, the nymphal stage of which can be as small as a poppy seed, so the tick and its bite often go unnoticed.

Fostering new ideas to give back to the community

The following is a guest blog from Angela Luedke, PhD student, Centre for Neuroscience Studies.

Beginning a new graduate program in a new city can be challenging. Getting to know your peers and settling into your research program is both exciting, and intimidating. Luckily, when I started as a young Master’s student at the Centre for 

Saving Rainforest with a Stethoscope

Most of you probably don’t know Dr. Andrew Winterborn, mostly because you don’t have a need for contact with our university veterinarian. Educated at l’Université de Montréal followed by a three year residency in Comparative Medicine at the University of Rochester Medical Centre, Andrew has been the Queen’s University veterinarian for almost 8 years. Andrew takes enormous pride in contributing to our research mission through his work as a veterinary scientist, and anyone who interacts with Andrew understands just how lucky we are to have him at Queen’s.

Reading week in Japan: A cultural and clinical exchange for rehab therapy students

The following is a guest blog by three Occupational Therapy students who recently represented the Queen’s School of Rehabilitation Therapy in Japan. Faculty member Setareh Ghahari and students Casandra Boushey, Charlotte Larry and Gowshia Visuvalingam travelled to the Niigata University of Health and Welfare as part of a formalized a relationship between the two schools to foster cultural and academic exchange and research collaboration between the two institutions. 

Assisted Dying: A medical student’s perspective

I would like to introduce you to June Duong, Meds ’19. It was a pleasure to invite her to write a guest blog to share her thoughts on assisted dying.


Celebrating outstanding faculty members

Once a year, we spend an evening celebrating what has been collectively achieved in our Faculty of Health Sciences over the past year. We recognize the contributions by faculty members who are stepping down, and we honour special academic contributions through our Faculty of Health Sciences awards. This year, with the help of Dr. Phil Wattam, we established the Regional Education Awards to recognize the contributions of educators who are working in our partner programs across Ontario.

“What will you do next?” Preparing for a career in nursing

Convocation is in the air right now at Queen’s. Almost every day, graduates in gowns can be spotted on campus, smiling, carrying flowers and posing for pictures. On Monday last week, our nursing graduates crossed the stage to receive their degrees in Grant Hall. As they did so, they moved on to a new chapter in their lives. And I am sure that now, more than ever (and like all of the other recent graduates across campus), they have been asked the age-old question: “what will you do next?”

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