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COVID-19 Operations Manual

Table of Contents

  1. GUIDING PRINCIPLES (as of July 23, 2020)
  2. STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (as of July 23, 2020)
  3. FACULTY GUIDELINES
  1. FACILITY OPERATIONS (As of August 21, 2020)
  1. EDUCATIONAL OPERATIONS
  1. REPORTING PROTOCOLS (As of August 27, 2020 from KFL&A Health)
  1. OUTBREAK PROTOCOL
  2. HUMAN RESOURCES (from Queen’s HR page, as of August 21, 2020)
  1. GLOSSARY
  2. FAQ

Appendix A

Appendix B

Appendix C

1. GUIDING PRINCIPLES (as of July 23, 2020)

  • 1.1  The Faculty of Health Sciences at Queen’s University will use these guiding principles to steer our community towards effective decision-making practices and strategic planning considering the current global pandemic. Accepting that the pandemic poses a risk of illness, these principles have been established to mitigate this risk to the best of our ability. The Faculty will be mindful of these uncertain times and remain flexible and responsive to student, staff, and faculty needs.  We believe that our comprehensive well-being includes the availability of positive educational and social interactions.
  • 1.1.1      The Faculty of Health Sciences is committed to the collective health, safety and comprehensive well-being of its students, staff, faculty and community.
  • 1.1.2      The Faculty of Health Sciences will maintain our standard of clinical, administrative and academic excellence.
  • 1.1.3      The Faculty of Health Sciences will seek inclusive and equitable solutions to barriers in order to minimize adverse impacts on our members.
  • 1.1.4      The Faculty of Health Sciences will ensure all operating procedures align with recommendations from Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox, & Addington Public Health as well as provincial guidelines and directives.
  • 1.1.5      The Faculty of Health Sciences will ensure regular communication with and accountability to the central leadership at Queen’s University.
  • 1.1.6      The Faculty of Health Sciences will communicate frequently with its students, staff, and faculty to ensure everyone is well informed with respect to our activities.
  • 1.1.7      The Faculty of Health Sciences will engage in ongoing reflection on and updating of current processes and decision-making strategies to ensure the continual safety of its personnel and activities.

 

2.     STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (as of July 23, 2020)

  • 2.1  This standard operating procedure (SOP) outlines the general instruction to be used by all schools, departments and units as theFaculty of Health Sciences (FHS) community returns to campus during the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic. These practices and guidelines are aimed at providing a safe working environment, reducing risk of virus transmission, and supporting compliance with public health regulations and provincial guidelines. Please note that students, staff and faculty have a professional obligation to self-monitor and they maintain personal responsibility for ensuring their health status according to local officials.
  • 2.2  Upon the phased re-entry of the FHS community, all schools, departments and units will:
    • 2.2.1      Engage in appropriate personal hand hygiene (see Section 3.2). 
    • 2.2.2      Sanitize classrooms and office spaces according to Queen’s current Environmental Health and Safety standards (see Section 3.6)
    • 2.2.3      Utilize the Elentra platform for consistent screening and monitoring protocols for students, staff, and faculty. The screening procedures will align with Kingston Health Sciences Centre standardized questions that are regularly updated (also see section 3.3.1).
    • 2.2.4      Observe scheduling restrictions of classrooms and office spaces. 
    • 2.2.5      Remain mindful of room capacity in accordance with existing guidelines, observe entry/exit requirements, and signage directives.
    • 2.2.6      Recognize that viral transmission is greater in closed spaces, crowded places and close contact with others and that appropriate infection protection and control precautions are required.
    • 2.2.7      Follow updated public health guidelines on the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) (see 3.11)
    • 2.2.8      Practice physical distancing guidelines, and when distancing is not possible, use a mask or appropriate facial covering.
    • 2.2.9      Masks are mandatory in the classrooms (except for lecturing faculty, subject to 2m physical distancing)
    • 2.2.10   Where possible and appropriate use the cohort method for student activity in university teaching and learning spaces (see 4.0 “Educational Operations”).
    • 2.2.11   Follow public health guidelines and FHS protocol if a student, staff, or faculty member becomes ill with COVID-19 or shows symptoms of said virus.
    • 2.2.12   A daily record of the buildings each individual will be accessing will be maintained using Elentra.  

 

3.     FACULTY GUIDELINES

  • 3.1  Physical Distancing (Adapted from KFL&A Health as of July 23, 2020)
    • 3.1.1      Stay 2 metres (6 feet) away from others if possible (if not, wear a mask. See: Section 3.11) and post signs reminding students/faculty/workers to maintain that distance from one another.
    • 3.1.2      Seating is separated by at least 2 metres (6 feet) in waiting areas and common rooms. Desks are separated by at least 2 metres (6 feet).
    • 3.1.3      There will be established seating for students, indicated with markers. This is the only permitted seating.
    • 3.1.4     Students are excepted to disinfect their desks and chair prior to sitting in their classroom. All faculty and staff are expected to continue to clean their own equipment including various electronics, keyboards, office equipment, lab equipment, and lunchroom equipment such as fridges, coffee makers, etc.
    • 3.1.5      Use flexible hours or staggered start/break times to limit interpersonal interactions. An attendant will be situated at each entrance to assist the Faculty of Health Sciences with the maintenance of safety and security.
    • 3.1.6      Wherever possible, divide students/faculty/workers into teams or cohorts that avoid close contact with other teams/cohorts.
      • Each cohort is to include a maximum of six individuals
    • 3.1.7      Occupancy capacity is determined by the capacity of each individual space rather than the building as a whole. This includes guidelines for common spaces that are utilized by the regular occupants as well as those traversing through the building. The metrics governing physical layout and workplace occupancy under physical distancing guidelines are:
      • Non-fixed seating areas (e.g. research labs): 1 person per 18.5 sqm.
      • Fixed seating areas (e.g. classrooms, office areas with fixed furniture placement): 2 metres (6 feet) physical separation.
    • 3.1.8      Measures to Limit/Restrict Access to Common & Smaller Shared Spaces should be instituted as outlined by the Queen’s Return to Campus Guidelines.
      • Kitchenettes, Lounges, Break Rooms and Meeting Spaces
        • Limit occupancy in these spaces to the assessed total or provincial guidelines, whichever is the most restrictive, and provide signage.
        • Stagger lunch/break times to minimize opportunity for transmission.
        • Advise employees to bring food and beverage items from home and to manage them individually (e.g. utilizing ice packs and coolers rather than accessing shared refrigerators and microwaves).
        • Discourage use of shared appliances such as kettles, coffee makers, toaster ovens, and water coolers, which will need to be disinfected by employees.
      • Common Spaces Used for Programmatic Purposes
      • Capacity should be determined for common areas when they are used for programmatic purposes (e.g. Goodes Hall Commons). Signage will be required to reroute regular pedestrian traffic from these areas when they are being used for programming.
        • Washrooms
      • If a safe physical distance cannot be maintained in a multi-stall washroom, then it should be considered single use. For example, if there is not enough clearance from point of entry to allow an individual to pass safely by another at the sink to a stall, then it should be considered single use.
      • Move a waste receptacle outside of the washroom for discarding paper towels.
        • Meeting Rooms
      • Meetings should continue to be held virtually where possible.
      • For face to face meetings, mark certain seats as unavailable in meetings rooms in order to maintain 2 metre distancing.
        • Elevators
      • Restrict elevator use to one person at a time, for accessibility reasons or for moving equipment.
      • Ensure appropriate signage for a single occupancy elevator is posted. Stand aside as the individual exits the elevator to allow adequate physical distancing.
        • Classrooms
      • If seating cannot be moved to 2 metre distancing, then mark seats as available. Unmarked seats are not to be used.
      • Use directional signage for circulation where there are multiple entrances (see Appendix A).
      • Use floor decals to encourage distancing when waiting to enter the classroom.
        • Clinical Education Spaces
      • Waiting rooms should be discouraged. Standardized patients and/or volunteer patients should be escorted into the facility when instructed to do so.
      • See Educational Operations (Section 4.0) regarding standardized patients and volunteer patients.
    • 3.1.9      Measures for workspace modification may need to be considered to enable appropriate physical distancing and health and safety practices. Where workstations cannot be separated by at least 2 metres, provide alternate means to ensure employees are at least 2 metres apart. For example:
      • Utilize every other desk, seat, or workstation.
      • Relocate employees to currently unoccupied rooms such as meeting rooms.
      • Consider flexible work arrangements with employees alternating days in the workspace.
      • Consider temporary “office hoteling” where employees do not use a regular assigned workspace but rather, they reserve desk space for the days they are in the office, allowing for temporary use by different individuals. This will maximize office space; however, thorough sanitizing practices must be implemented with the employees disinfecting surfaces at arrival and before departure
    • 3.1.10   The total number of students permitted in each instructional space at any one time must be limited to the number that can maintain a physical distance of at least two metres and in any event cannot exceed 50 persons if the space is indoors and 100 persons outdoors.
    • 3.1.11   Traffic flow control measures should be taken at entry/exit points and circulation paths:
      • Entrances and Exits
      • If multiple doors are not available for entrances and exits and the direction of flow cannot be managed, designate dedicated building entrances and exits with proper signage.
      • Where possible have controlled exit and entry points for offices with traffic flow arrows.
      • Circulation Paths: Corridors, Hallways and Stairwells
      • Where appropriate physical distancing cannot be accomplished in main circulation paths such as narrow corridors and entryways, consider opportunities for designating the direction of foot-traffic. Good judgement should be exercised when determining directional routes, including giving consideration to accessibility issues. Similarly, circulation paths should not result in individuals having to spend a considerably greater amount of time in the corridor to reach their destination, potentially resulting in more people in the common space and increasing the risk of person to person contact.
      • University signage is available for supervisors to use in their specific departments and workspaces and to building managers for common spaces.
      • Floor decals are available to mark 2 metre spacing for physical distancing where queues could form (example: line for elevators, classrooms, washrooms etc.).
      • It is recommended that units review the building mapping information prior to installing directional signage.
    • 3.1.12   Signage (See full list of University-provided signage, recommended usage, and responsibility for posting in Appendix A) should be posted reminding building occupants to:
      • Limit large indoor gatherings to 50 people or less.
      • Large gatherings must follow the physical distancing guidelines of 6 feet apart
      • Avoid handshakes or hugs
      • Stay home if you are sick
      • Work remotely and stay home whenever it is possible

3.2  Hand Hygiene (Adapted from KFL&A Health, Public Health Ontario, and Public Health Canada – as of July 23, 2020)

  • 3.2.1      Signage should be posted reminding building occupants to wash their hands after they
    • Sneeze, cough or blow your nose
    • Use the washroom or change diapers
    • Handle garbage, raw foods, or dirty dishes
    • Play or work outdoors
    • Prepare or eat food
    • Touch a cut or open sore.
  • 3.2.2      Signage posted reminding occupants to wash their hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds.
    • How to adequately wash hands:
      • Wet hands with warm water.
      • Apply soap.
    • Wash hands for at least 20 seconds (including your palms, back of each hand, between fingers, thumbs and under nails).
    • Rinse well.
    • Dry hands well with paper towel.
    • Turn off tap using paper towel.
    • Dry your hands with a paper towel, or with your own cloth towel that no one else shares.
    • Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
    • 3.2.3      Signs are posted reminding workers and customers to cough or sneeze into their elbow, not their hand; or to cover their mouth and nose with a tissue and clean their hands.
    • 3.2.4      Alcohol-based hand rub (ABHR) is available in public areas, elevators, workstations, and for use in vehicles or off-site work.
      • Dispenser type hand sanitizers will be placed at all building entrances and exits as a minimum standard. The dispensers will be serviced by Queen’s Physical Plant Services (QPPS). Moreover, hand sanitizer bottles will be placed in shared meeting rooms aligned with the phased return to campus.
      • Each department will be provided with an initial supply of hand sanitizer and disinfectant wipes and will be expected to order and pay for replacements as required. Strategic Procurement Services is working on a reliable supply chain as these items remain difficult to procure. Information for ordering these items can be found on the Strategic Procurement website.
      • If departments choose to make additional hand sanitizer available, it is recommended they procure and distribute pump style bottles rather than sourcing additional dispensing units. This avoids the issues that might arise from having to mount the units on walls and the need to maintain and refill the dispensing units.
      • All faculty and staff are expected to continue to clean their own equipment including various electronics, keyboards, office equipment, lab equipment, and lunchroom equipment such as fridges, coffee makers, etc.
      • Cleaning products can be purchased on acQuire
      • Students are expected to disinfect their desks and chair prior to sitting in their classroom.
      • ABHR is 70 to 90% alcohol and is not expired.
      • Pictorial signs of how to use ABHR are available here.
    • 3.2.5      Hand washing signs are posted in restrooms
    • 3.2.6      In restrooms, soap and paper towels are available near the sink
      • The university has a reliable supply chain for washroom soap and will be refilling twice a day.
      • Paper towels will be provided in washroom locations that currently only have hand dryers so the community will have both options available to them.

3.3  COVID-19 Screening

  • 3.3.1      Screening will be done for learners, staff, and faculty utilizing the Elentra Platform. This replicates the Kingston Health Sciences Centre (KHSC) Screening Tool and is subject to change.
  • 3.3.2      KHSC Screening Tool (As of August 25, 2020)
    • Do you have a fever (temperature of ≥ 37.8 C)?
    • Do you have any of the following symptoms (onset in the past 7 days)?
      • New or worsening cough
      • Sore throat
      • Shortness of breath
      • Chills
      • Runny nose, sneezing, nasal congestion (not due to other underlying reasons like seasonal allergies or post-nasal drip)
      • Difficulty swallowing
      • New and/or unexplained headache
      • Unexplained fatigue/malaise
      • Unexplained nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain
      • Changes in your sense of taste/smell
    • Have you been tested for COVID-19 and are awaiting results OR tested positive for COVID-19 in the last 30 days (asymptomatic or surveillance testing does not apply)?
    • In the last 14 days, have you travelled outside of Canada, or been in contact with a sick traveler?
    • In the past 14 days, have you had close contact (see glossary) with any of the following
    • a sick traveler
    • someone who is sick with a respiratory infection
    • someone suspected or confirmed to have COVID-19
  • 3.3.3      What if I answer yes to any of these questions (as of August 14, 2020)
    • Faculty/Staff
      • DO NOT come to campus if you exhibit COVID-19 symptoms. Self-isolate as per public health guidance.
      • Please complete the Ontario COVID-19 Self-Assessment tool (found at https://covid-19.ontario.ca/self-assessment/) and follow the recommendations outlined when the assessment is completed.
      • Should you be required to self-isolate or if you are quarantined, follow the following steps:
      • Contact your manager or designate to discuss your absence and alternate work arrangements.
      • If you feel well, and are able to do so, you are encouraged to work from home. Maintain regular contact with your manager or designate, and check the central COVID-19 information page for updates.
      • Complete the COVID-19 quarantine or self-isolation form and submit it to hrrtw@queensu.ca
    • Students
      • DO NOT come to campus if you exhibit COVID-19 symptoms. Self-isolate as per public health guidance.
      • Please complete the Ontario COVID-19 Self-Assessment tool (found at https://covid-19.ontario.ca/self-assessment/) and follow the recommendations outlined when the assessment is completed.
    • Volunteer Patients
      • DO NOT come to campus if you exhibit COVID-19 symptoms. Self-isolate as per public health guidance.
      • Please complete the Ontario COVID-19 Self-Assessment tool (found at https://covid-19.ontario.ca/self-assessment/) and follow the recommendations outlined when the assessment is completed.
      • Please have volunteer patients complete the KHSC Screening Tool on the Elentra Platform.
    • Standardized Patients
      • DO NOT come to campus if you exhibit COVID-19 symptoms. Self-isolate as per public health guidance
      • Please complete the Ontario COVID-19 Self-Assessment tool (found at https://covid-19.ontario.ca/self-assessment/) and follow the recommendations outlined when the assessment is completed.
      • Please have standardized patients complete the KHSC Screening Tool on the Elentra Platform.
    • Guests/Other
      • DO NOT come to campus if you exhibit COVID-19 symptoms. Self-isolate as per public health guidance.
      • Please complete the Ontario COVID-19 Self-Assessment tool (found at https://covid-19.ontario.ca/self-assessment/) and follow the recommendations outlined when the assessment is completed.

3.4  Self-Quarantine/Self Isolation (From KFL&A Health, as of July 14)

  • 3.4.1      All individuals who return from any travel outside of Canada are required by law to self-isolate (see glossary) for 14 days and to monitor for symptoms of COVID-19. The most common symptoms include:
    • fever
    • cough
    • difficulty breathing
    • muscle aches
    • headache
    • sore throat
    • runny nose
  • 3.4.2      Individuals will also be required to stay home to self-isolate if they:
    • are identified as a person diagnosed with COVID-19,
    • have the signs or symptoms of COVID-19, have similar signs or symptoms, or who have tested for COVID-19 and are awaiting results,
    • otherwise have reasonable grounds to believe they have symptoms of COVID-19
    • are a close contact of a person identified in (a) or by KFL&A Public Health.
    • A close contact is a person who is caring for or living in the same household with someone who has COVID-19 or is otherwise identified as a close contact by KFL&A Public Health

3.5  Monitoring (From KFL&A Health and Queen’s University COVID-19 Monitoring Guideline– as of July 23, 2020)

  • 3.5.1      Self-monitoring:
    • Individuals should self-monitor their temperature on a daily basis and, if presenting with a fever (temperature of 37.8°C or greater) should stay home and self-isolate (visiting a COVID-19 Assessment center notwithstanding).
    • Employees should read through and complete the Employee Self-Monitoring Checklist. (see Appendix B)
  • 3.5.2      Passive monitoring:
    • Passive Monitoring will be achieved through signage on campus that will provide a clear and visible reminder to all individuals entering the building to not enter the facility if they are exhibiting any symptoms of COVID-19 and to practice the required public health measures such as physical distancing, hand hygiene, respiratory etiquette, etc., when in the facility.
    • The signage that will be deployed is as follows: (see Appendix A for more information)
      • Symptom monitoring poster
      • Public health procedures poster
      • Hand washing posters in bathrooms
      • Physical distancing posters for common areas including reception areas, lunch and breakrooms
      • Respiratory Etiquette poster
      • Hand sanitizing posters
      • Elevator and washroom access posters.
      • Directional signage for guiding flow of traffic within buildings
  • 3.5.3      Active monitoring:
    • The intent of active monitoring is to reduce the potential for illness spread by identifying potential cases to ensure they are managed.
    • As part of phased re-entry, all learners, staff, and faculty will be required to do complete a daily screen using the Elentra Platform (see 3.3)
    • Active monitoring of those who are working remotely may include some of the following recommendations:
      • Regular email check-ins with employees
      • Regular virtual check-ins with employees (using zoom or team meetings)
      • Encouragement of employee peer-to-peer check-ins while on-site.
  • 3.6  Sanitation (Adapted from Public Health Ontario “Cleaning and Disinfection for Public Settings” and KFL&A Health and Queen’s University COVID-19 Cleaning Protocols– as of August 7, 2020)
    • 3.6.1      There is a schedule for routine cleaning of environmental surfaces (see 3.6.5).
    • 3.6.2      The disinfectant in use is has a Drug Identification Number (DIN), is not expired, and is mixed and applied according to the label instructions, including contact time.
    • 3.6.3      Workspaces are adequately ventilated.
      • Buildings across campus have a wide variety of ventilation systems installed with varying capabilities. Where applicable, and equipment allows, the following measures may be implemented:
      • Increase the amount of fresh air being brought into buildings through air handlers.
      • Reduce the amount of air being recirculated through buildings.
      • Promote the use of operable windows during favourable weather conditions.
      • Discourage the use of personal desk fans, low ceiling fans, window air conditioners and other devices which could create high velocity air flows in open office spaces or other shared spaces.
      • Adjust ventilation schedules to increase fan run times before and after building occupied hours.
      • Prioritize ventilation fan system preventative maintenance measures on air handlers including regular filter changes.
    • 3.6.4      All surfaces, especially those that are horizontal and frequently touched (high touch) surfaces, should be cleaned at least twice per day and when visibly dirty.
      • Examples of high touch surfaces include doorknobs, elevator buttons, light switches, toilet handles, counters, handrails, touch screen surfaces and keypads.
      • High touch zones should be cleaned first to remove visible dirt, then disinfected.
      • It is recommended that items that cannot be easily cleaned (e.g., newspapers, magazines, stuffed toys) be removed.
      • Faculty, staff and students are expected to continue to clean their own equipment, including electronics, keyboards, office, laboratory, and lunchroom equipment.
    • 3.6.5      Queen’s University Physical Plant Services will provide cleaning activities by areas and associated frequencies are listed below. These represent the capacity of cleaning on campus within the current funding model. During times when the campus is not fully occupied, there may be opportunity to increase the frequency of cleaning in laboratories from every other day to every day and office cleaning from every month to once per week.
    • 3.6.6      In light of the COVID-19 virus, cleaning protocols have been adjusted to focus on cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched surfaces in all areas serviced below and including elevator buttons, stair railings, doorknobs and plates, faucets and water fountains, all typically every four hours.
    • 3.6.7      Washrooms (Twice a day)
      • Picking up of garbage: cleaning and disinfecting bins
      • Sweeping and picking up of garbage on the floor
      • Checking and refilling of paper towel, soap, and toilet paper dispensers
      • Cleaning and disinfecting of mirror, sink, and sink counter
      • Cleaning and disinfecting of toilets and urinals
      • Wiping, cleaning and disinfecting of high-level surfaces
      • Wiping off dust particles from lamp fixtures
      • Cleaning and disinfecting of the ventilation grill and entrance door-metal plate
      • Sweeping and mopping and disinfecting of the floor.
    • 3.6.8      Kitchens (Cleaned once daily)
      • Picking up of garbage: cleaning and disinfecting bins
      • Sweeping and picking up garbage on the floor
      • Checking and refilling of paper towel and soap dispensers
      • Cleaning and disinfecting of the sink and sink counter and appliance handles
    • 3.6.9      Personal Offices (Cleaned once a month)
    • 3.6.10   General Offices (Cleaned once a week – garbage daily)
      • Picking up of garbage from recycling bin stations: cleaning and disinfecting bins
      • Sweeping and picking up garbage on the floor
      • Vacuuming floors with carpets o Cleaning and disinfecting furniture
      • Checking and refilling or replacing hand sanitizers and disinfectant solution
    • 3.6.11   Meeting rooms (Cleaned daily)
      • Picking up of garbage from recycling bin stations: cleaning and disinfecting bins
      • Sweeping and picking up garbage on the floor and vacuuming floors with carpets
      • Cleaning and disinfecting office counters, tables, chairs and desktops
      • Checking and refilling or replacing hand sanitizers and disinfectant solution and paper towels
      • Student common areas (Cleaned daily)
      • Picking up of garbage from recycling bin stations: cleaning and disinfecting bins
      • Sweeping and picking up garbage on the floor and disinfecting same
      • Vacuuming floors with carpets
      • Cleaning and disinfection of counters, tables, and desk tops
    • 3.6.12   Classrooms (Cleaned daily)
    • Students are excepted to disinfect their desks and chair prior to sitting in their classroom.
    • Waste removal, cleaning and disinfecting recycling bins (where bins exist in classrooms)
    • Sweeping and picking up of garbage on the floor and disinfecting same
    • Wiping and cleaning of high- surfaces (e.g. vents, chalkboards, whiteboards, etc.)
    • Cleaning of mirrors
    • Vacuuming of carpeted floor
    • Sweeping and mopping of floors
    • Cleaning and disinfecting of counters, tables, and desk tops
  • 3.6.13   Labs (every other day)
    • Waste removal, cleaning and disinfecting recycling bins
    • Sweeping and picking up of garbage on the floor and disinfecting same
    • Cleaning of mirrors
    • Vacuuming of carpeted floor
    • Sweeping and mopping of floors
    • Cleaning and disinfecting of counters, tables, chairs and desk tops
  • 3.6.14   Testing and immunization sites (Cleaned daily and as required - dedicated personnel in the space)
    • Picking up of garbage from recycling bin stations
    • Sweeping and picking up garbage on the floor
    • Vacuuming floors with carpets
    • PIDAC compliant cleaning and disinfecting of all spaces

3.7  Cleaning protocols in the event of a confirmed COVID case in university space

  • 3.7.1      When alerts or reports of suspected virus contamination are received, the Provincial Infectious Diseases Advisory Committee (PIDAC) trained response team conducts isolation cleaning and disinfection of the space using recommended chemicals while dressed in full personal protective equipment.
  • 3.7.2      Cleaning and disinfecting will include using disinfected pre-charged microfibre cloths to clean and disinfect. Misting or spraying of vertical and horizontal areas using an approved cleaning disinfectant will be applied in the treatment of pandemic outbreak-impacted spaces.
  • 3.7.3      Spaces will be ventilated post cleaning and typically available for use within two to four hours
  • 3.7.4      Surface bacterial and microbial tests are randomly and routinely conducted as part of quality assurance.

3.8  COVID-19 return to work for Staff, Faculty, and Graduate Students (as of August 14 from HR website/COG website)

  • 3.8.1      You can only return to campus with the approval of your Department. Please contact your Manager, Supervisor, or Department Head to discuss and/or request your return. Graduate students who wish to access on-campus spaces should contact their supervisor for information. In this context, the Department Head is the supervisor of teaching fellows, the course instructor is the supervisor of teaching assistants, and the faculty advisor is the supervisor of graduate students seeking access for research purposes.
  • 3.8.2      Units wishing to return to campus before on-campus activities are authorized to resume should first consider the Principles for decision-making during the COVID-19 pandemic.  If access is still deemed appropriate and necessary:
    • Unit completes the Request to Resume On-Campus Activities Form which collects necessary information to review opening plans. For units reporting to the Provost, forms must be approved and submitted by the Dean, Vice-Provost, or Deputy Provost or delegate.
    • For all other units, forms must be approved and submitted by the applicable Vice-Principal or delegate.
    • Form is submitted to campus.restart@queensu.ca 
    • Proposals will be approved by the Academic Operations Group (AOG) and/or the Senior Leadership Team (SLT)
    • After approval by AOG and/or SLT:
      • Building capacity subgroup to map building capacity (if / as applicable)
      • Guidelines/Health and Safety subgroup to review health and safety aspects of the plan and provide feedback to the submitting unit as required.
      • EH&S will liaise with David Walker/Heather Cole if public health input is required.  This should be limited because protocol information is publicly available. 
      • Campus Operations Group (COG) to be notified of proposals under review, and proposals approved.
  • 3.8.3      See Section 8.0, “Human Resources” for more information.

3.9  In the case of a confirmed case of COVID-19 on campus:

  • 3.9.1      The individual with the confirmed case must notify their supervisor/manager and immediately return home.
  • 3.9.2      The supervisor/manager must immediately inform Dan Langham, Director Environmental Health and Safety (613-533-6000 x74980, dan.langham@queensu.ca). Managers/employees are reminded that personal health information must be treated confidentially and emails with the infected individuals name should not be sent.
  • 3.9.3      Supervisors/managers are encouraged to keep records of all employees in the workplace
  • 3.9.4      If there is a confirmed positive case in a confined space, managers should send employees home until the space has been cleaned, or if required by Kingston Public Health, until self-isolation is complete.
  • 3.9.5      Dan Langham will coordinate with QPPS to organize a deep cleaning of the affected space. Note that the space is typically available for use within 2-4 hours after the cleaning
  • 3.9.6      The university administration will work with Kingston Public Health to determine the next steps required.
  • 3.9.7      Kingston Public Health will be responsible for the contact tracing and will identify those who are required to self-isolate
  • 3.9.8      Further queries can be sent to covidinfo@queensu.ca and they will be directed to the appropriate responder (do not include personal health information of others).
  • 3.9.9      See 3.7 surrounding cleaning protocols in the event of a confirmed COVID case in university space

3.10        Contact Tracing (as of August 7, 2020)

  • 3.10.1   As per 3.9.6, KFL&A Public Health will perform contact tracing to identify close contacts of a confirmed case. If you have been identified as a close contact of a confirmed case you will be contacted by KFL&A Pubic Health for further instruction. 

3.11      Personal Protective Equipment (As of July 23, from Queen’s COVID-Info and Ontario Public Health)

  • 3.11.1   Personal protective equipment includes items such as gloves, masks, lab coats, goggles, shields, and lab coats/scrubs. PPE is the last defense, and you should strive to reduce all hazards through elimination, substitution, engineering controls and/or administrative controls before considering PPE. 
  • 3.11.2   Who provides PPE?
    • FHS students are responsible for bringing their own masks for any necessary on-campus activities.
    • If a student forgets their mask, one will be provided for them.
    • Level II Surgical masks for clinical skills will be provided to students during clinical placements
    • Queen’s has purchased two cloth face masks for each employee. Cloth masks can be picked up by Queen’s employees at the Queen’s Postal & Print Services (QPPS) office in Fleming Hall, Jemmett Wing, Room 001. Employees are reminded to practice physical distancing as there are others picking up mail and/or COVID supply packages. As this building is not considered accessible, if you need assistance please contact QPPS at (613) 533-6305 and your items will be delivered curbside to your vehicle.
    • At this time, we ask that only those authorized to be on campus pick up their cloth masks. Strategic Procurement Services will work with Faculties and departments on a broader distribution plan as campus operations are approved to resume.
    • Employees can also use their own masks or face covering.
  • 3.11.3   Correct usage of cloth masks:
    • Make sure it fits snugly.
    • Avoid touching the front of the mask; if you do, clean your hands immediately.
    • Remove it when it becomes soiled, damp, or damaged.
    • Remove the mask by the straps, then clean your hands.
    • Do not share the mask with others.
    • Between uses, machine wash with hot water and regular detergent.
    • If you must use it again before washing, fold the front of the mask in on itself and store in a paper bag.
  • 3.11.4   Acceptable PPE
    • Face coverings do not replace required job-specific Personal Protective Equipment, such as medical/procedure masks, face shields or respirators. Also, the use of reusable cloth face masks may not be suitable in certain environments (i.e. chemical, radiological, biological labs). In these instances, disposable masks, appropriate to the hazard, need to be considered if physical distancing cannot be maintained.
    • Example of proposed School of Rehabilitation Therapy PPE requirements (see Appendix C)
    • Only Level II Surgical masks are acceptable for students working in clinical settings
  • 3.11.5   Who is required to wear PPE? (As of July 24, 2020, from Queen’s COVID info page and KFL&A Health)
  • All individuals in indoor public or common spaces at Queen’s will be required to wear a face covering as of July 24. This includes lobbies, hallways, stairwells, restrooms, elevators, and other areas that are shared with others.
  • Masks are mandatory in the classrooms (except for lecturing faculty, subject to 2m physical distancing
  • Examples of where face coverings are not required include:
    • While working alone in one’s own (non-public/non-student) work area/office/lab/research space
    • While working behind plexiglass servicing people and where a physical distancing of at least 2m can be maintained
    • When eating or drinking (with 2m physical distancing being maintained)
    • A Person shall be exempt from wearing a Face Covering on the premises if:
    • The Person is a child under the age of two years; or a child under the age of 5 years either chronologically or developmentally and he or she refuses to wear a face covering and cannot be persuaded to do so by their caregiver;
    • Wearing a Face Covering would inhibit the Person’s ability to breathe in any way;
    • For any other medical reason, the Person cannot safely wear a Face Covering such as, but not limited to, respiratory disease, cognitive difficulties or difficulties in hearing or processing information.
    • The Person is unable to apply or remove a Face Covering without assistance, including those who are accommodated under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) or who have protections under the Ontario Human Rights Code, R.S.O. 1990, c.H.19, as amended.

4.     FACILITY OPERATIONS (As of August 21, 2020)

  • 4.1  Room capacity regulations
  • 4.2  Directive signages
    • 4.2.1      See Appendix A for a full list of signage (e.g. Face Mask, Traffic Flow, and Occupancy Limit signs).
    • 4.2.2      Appendix A includes the recommended placement of each sign and the party responsible for posting said sign.
  • 4.3 Timetabling/scheduling
    • 4.3.1      Fall academic bookings
      • All timetabled curriculum room bookings have been scheduled for Fall 2020.
      • Additional requirements for academic bookings will need to be booked.
    • 4.3.2      Booking an FHS activity in an FHS building
      • The Faculty of Health Sciences is responsible for booking activities in their own facilities
      • Space booking priorities continue for academic programming.
      • To book an FHS activity in one of the following FHS building, please contact the following people:          
        • School of Medicine, GSK Clinical Education Centre, and MacGillvray Brown Hall: Jen Saunders Jennifer.sauders@queensu.ca
        • Louise D. Acton Building: Sandra Turcotte turcotte@queensu.ca
        • Cataraqui Building: Cheryl Pulling Cheryl.pulling@queensu.ca
          • Approval for these buildings is as follows:
            • School of Medicine, GSK Clinical Education Centre, and MacGillvray Brown Hall - Dr. Leslie Flynn
            • Louise D. Acton Building - Dr. Marcia Finlayson
            • Cataraqui Building - Dr. Erna Snelgrove-Clarke
    • 4.3.3      Academic programming in Central spaces
      • Space booking priorities continue to be for academic programming.
      • Meetings that can be held virtually should use Zoom or Teams.
      • Central has developed their own room booking request process. Details of this process and available classrooms can be found here.
        • Booking requests for central spaces are made through our FHS representative, Denis Bourguignon denis.bourguignon@queensu.ca
        • Please include details on the function, number of people, and the reason for on campus activity.
        • Please note that Etherington Hall and Richardson Laboratory are booked centrally.
    • 4.3.4      Provincial capacity limits
      • No bookings for over 50 people indoors will be approved
      • No bookings for over 100 people outdoors will be approved
    • 4.3.5      If you are hosting an event on campus, you will be required to adhere to FHS protocols in light of the COVID-19 pandemic including physical distancing, mask use, and screening.

4.4  Office procedures

  • 4.4.1      You can only be on campus if you have been approved to be there
  • 4.4.2      A process has been established for staff to return to campus
  • 4.4.3      Please refer to your manager for further instruction on your ability to return to campus

5.     EDUCATIONAL OPERATIONS

  • 5.1  Student Cohort Model
    • 5.1.1      Programs will adhere to the Student Cohort model for all teaching activities
    • 5.1.2      As outlined by the provincial government, cohorting refers to the practice of “keeping students together in a small group throughout their school day, with limited exposure to multiple teachers or a wide variety of classmates” (Guide to reopening Ontario’s schools, 2020). Cohorting will limit contact with others to a specified group of people. The rationale behind this practice includes reducing the risk of virus transmission and facilitating contact tracing in the event of an outbreak while maintaining a sense of community.
    • 5.1.3      The provincial government has provided assurance that cohorting is pedagogically sound and respects an educational institution’s obligation and desire to deliver education.
  • 5.2  Student Cohort Model
    • 5.2.1      Students are placed into cohorts of up to 6 students
    • 5.2.2      Cohorts are decided by each program.
    • 5.2.3      Programs will notify students of their cohort.
    • 5.2.4      All students are required to complete a 2-week quarantine period prior to entering their cohort.
    • 5.2.5      Students complete small group activities and other educational activities with their cohort as directed by their program.
    • 5.2.6      Personal Protective Equipment is required at all times.
    • 5.2.7      Outside of school activities, students are encouraged to maintain interaction within their social circle. Please refer to the Ministry of Ontario guidelines regarding best practices for social circles here.
    • 5.2.8      As much as possible, please enter and exit buildings with your cohort.
    • 5.2.9      If a student encounters interpersonal challenges with a team member in their cohort, the appropriate program office should be informed.
    • 5.2.10   Students are required to wear a mask when they are present inside a Queen’s University building.
    • 5.2.11   In an effort to minimize risk to colleagues, especially cohort members, student travel during clinical placements or extended class time in the hospital, is restricted. Check with your program regarding current travel advice for your year of study.
    • 5.2.12   If it is necessary for a student to travel while simultaneously completing clinical work in a hospital setting, students should be mindful to limit their visits to family members only and abide by municipal public health guidelines during their stay.
    • 5.2.13   Cohorts will be assigned the same Standardized Patient for the entire term.
    • 5.2.14   Students are asked to not put their cohort (this includes the Standardized Patient assigned to the cohort) at risk by failing to follow the appropriate guidelines put forth by public health.
    • 5.2.15   In the event of a positive COVID-19 test, students will follow up with their program office.
  • 5.3  Faculty Guidelines for Classroom Use
    • 5.3.1      Ensure physical distancing is maintained from students seated in front row. Standing behind podium will maintain 2m physical distancing in all classrooms.
    • 5.3.2      End class at the specified time so that sufficient time is provided for students to exit and enter class while maintaining physical distancing.
    • 5.3.3      Do not allow students to break physical distancing to ask one-on-one questions.
  • 5.4  Classroom direction signage
    • 5.4.1      Please adhere to the directional signage in each classroom including entry and exist arrows
    • 5.4.2      Do not use unauthorized doors
    • 5.4.3      Remain physically distant (unless with one’s cohort) to others in the classroom
  • 5.5  Scheduling
    • 5.5.1      Scheduling of classroom space will be done centrally prior to each term
    • 5.5.2      Where possible, please consider using online learning for some courses.
    • 5.5.3      Every effort will be made to keep all students in one space for large lecture though this may not always be feasible due to space restrictions.
    • 5.5.4      On-campus activities will be limited to academic activities.
    • 5.5.5      Request for increased capacity for our classroom space will be possible. A protocol will be made available.
    • 5.5.6      Non-academic activities will be extremely limited.  Requests will be individually assessed by the University.
    • 5.5.7      Scheduling of space for clinical teaching/labs will be done centrally and in collaboration with FHS.
      • Curriculum activities have priority
      • Currently, all spaces have been assessed with maximum capacity of 30%.
      • Those requesting space are responsible for ensuring the appropriate screening is completed.
    • 5.6  Volunteer & Standardized Patients
      • 5.6.1      Volunteers and SPs are required to follow the same guidelines as faculty and students (see Faculty Guidelines)
      • 5.6.2      Volunteer & SPs are subject to the same screening protocols as students, staff and faculty

6.     REPORTING PROTOCOLS (As of August 27, 2020 from KFL&A Health)

  • 6.1  The following complaints are enforceable by the Kingston Police or the OPP
    • Self-isolation for returning travellers, under the Quarantine Act.
    • Organized public or social gatherings:
      • Indoor gatherings over a maximum of 50 people
      • Outdoor gatherings over a maximum of 100 people

    • 6.1.1      If any of these incidents are happening, call:
      • In the city of Kingston - Kingston Police, 613-549-4660
      • Outside Kingston - O.P.P, 1-888-310-1122
  • 6.2  The following complaints are reportable to KFL&A Public Health:
    • COVID-19 case or contact not self-isolating
    • A site is not operating safely or not following the order to require face coverings 

  • 6.3  The following complaints are not enforceable by KFL&A Public Health or the Kingston Police:
    • Personal infection prevention, e.g. hand washing
    • Self-isolation for anyone other than returning travellers
    • Physical distancing, unless it is a public or social gathering of more than 10 people not from the same household.
  • 6.4  In the case of a confirmed case of COVID-19 on campus:

7. OUTBREAK PROTOCOL

  • 7.1  Institutions are to collaborate with local Public Health to determine how many cases constitute an outbreak.
  • 7.2  In response to a COVID outbreak, Queen’s University will use an Incident Management Command organizational structure. The IMS is a standardized approach to emergency management encompassing personnel, facilitates, equipment, procedures, and communications operating within an established organization structure. IMS is predicated on the understanding that in every incident, there are certain management functions that must be carried out, which can be performed by the same individual depending on the scope of the emergency. It is designed to be scalable (expanded or retracted) depending on the level of operational response needed.
  • 7.3  The Incident Command Team will be activated in the event that there are positive case(s) of COVID-19 or other urgent events related to COVID0-19 that have the potential to impact operations and individuals on campus.  The University Incident Commander will oversee that all responses are carried out during the emergency period.
  • 7.4  The University Incident Commander (UIC) is supported through other incident command functions, the Scene Incident Commander (SIC) and Section Chiefs that will provide information specific to the emergency or location while also providing strategic thinking through their expertise and training in a specific area, during Planning Cycle Meetings.
  • 7.5  The Principal has assigned the role of the UIC for COVID-19 outbreak response to the Provost.
  • 7.6  The UIC will be responsible for regular communications with the Principal to provide updates on progress of operations and receive strategic advice and direction. 

8. HUMAN RESOURCES (from Queen’s HR page, as of August 21, 2020

  • 8.1  Refusing Unsafe Work due to COVID-19
    • 8.1.1      Managers should ensure that their staff are fully aware of the precautions and guidelines that have been implemented as a result of the pandemic.  Being fully aware may ease some of the concerns staff have about a phased return of activities to campus.  It is also important to ensure that everyone is complying with University, Faculty and Departmental return to campus guidelines as well as the recommendations of public health officials.
    • 8.1.2      If an employee is expressing their nervousness to return to the workplace or refusing to return to the workplace, it is important to understand the basis for which an employee is concerned or refusing to attend the workplace.  Please consider options for allowing staff to work remotely while the concern is being addressed.
    • 8.1.3      Work Refusal – Health and Safety:  If the concern is related to feeling unsafe, first ensure the employee is aware of the resources and information available through the university and the measures that have been put in place by the department to reduce the risk of transmission. If the matter is not remedied at this stage, or if the employee “refuses” to attend due to health and safety concerns, contact the Department of Environmental Health and Safety for assistance in accordance with the University’s obligation under the Occupational Health and Safety Act.
    • 8.1.4      Staff Specific concerns: If the concern or work refusal is related to an employee’s personal situation, it is important to afford them with flexibility wherever possible.
    • 8.1.5      Caregiver Responsibilities: If the inability to return to the workplace is related to caregiver responsibilities, please refer to Flexible Working arrangements for staff with caregiving responsibilities Manager’s Guide.
    • 8.1.6      Health-related concerns: If the reason is related to an employee’s medical condition, please contact Return to Work and Accommodation Services for advice on whether an accommodation is necessary and options for accommodation, if available.
    • 8.1.7      Self-Isolation or Quarantine: If an employee is unable to attend the workplace due to self-isolation or quarantine, they may qualify for sick leave under the University’s Sick Leave Plan – consult with Return to Work.
    • 8.1.8      Other: If the concern or work refusal is for other reasons, or if you require further information, please consult with your HR Advisor.  

8.2  Additional leave

8.3  Working from Home (Updated August 21, 2020, from COG Document)

  • 8.3.1      Plans should be flexible with some people working largely on campus, some largely remotely, and some alternating between on campus and remote work.
  • 8.3.2      These plans will be dependent on the size of the workforce and workspace available in each department.
  • 8.3.3      Individuals with priority for returning to work (in ranked order of priority):
    • Staff and faculty with accommodation needs that cannot be addressed while working remotely. Managers should contact Return to Work services for assistance with medical accommodation and their Human Resources Advisor for support with other accommodation requests.
    • Staff and faculty required to deliver and support in-person academic activities including student services in Faculties.
    • Staff needed to provide support for residences, food services, some student services including Student Wellness Services, and Athletic and Recreation services and programming (the latter, as permitted by provincial and local public health direction).
    • In consultation with their unit head or dean, staff and faculty with extenuating home circumstances.
    • Student leaders who require access to their on-campus workspace to deliver services and provide support to the student community.
    • In consultation with their unit head or dean, staff and faculty who need to be in their on-campus workspace to be more productive or efficient.
  • 8.3.4      Some faculty and staff, who would usually be on-campus supporting the activities noted in items 2-3 above, should be supported if they choose to continue working remotely, these include:
    • Staff and faculty who are part of an At-risk group.
    • Staff and faculty in a home with an individual that is in an At-risk group.
    • Staff and faculty with care giving responsibilities that would prevent them from returning. See guidelines for staff with caregiving responsibilities and QUFA COVID-LOU, Schedule C, item 24.
    • Staff and faculty with extenuating circumstances that would preclude them from returning to campus.

8.4  Working Arrangements for Staff with Caregiving Responsibilities 

  • 8.4.1      The following guidelines are provided to assist Managers in supporting staff through this pandemic and in creating a welcoming and accessible environment for people with diverse needs:
    • Assess: Think about your operation and the essential work to be done.  As we are all learning, there may, in fact, be multiple ways in which your unit’s objectives can be achieved, for example, allowing employees to work unusual hours to complete their work.  Consider also how might the work that needs to be performed be reimagined, reprioritized, or restructured to respond to changes in the public health situation?  Recognize that this is not a “business as usual” environment.  For many units, flexibility will be necessary and is possible.
    • Communicate that flexible hours are available to staff where operations allow.  In some cases, caregivers may be able to effectively juggle their time during their workdays with little or no operational disruption. Where possible, let staff decide how to manage their day. Not only will this nurture a positive professional relationship, but it will also allow employees to work optimally.
    • Support staff by communicating with them regularly. Review their workloads and check-in on their well-being. Be open about the realities and difficulties of extra responsibilities such as caregiving for family members during this time. Let your employees know that you will respect their confidentiality.
    • Focus on mutual trust, so that you can ensure that your staff are honest about their ability to perform their tasks and that they are comfortable coming to you for support if they need it.
    • Be open to Connecting with kids!  You will likely be interacting with your team via video calls. This means you will be getting a glimpse into their private lives, their homes, and their children. Accept that some parents will need to attend virtual meetings with kids in the room or even in their laps. Understand that for many parents this is the most effective way to work. Be flexible and open to minor distractions.
  • 8.4.2      Some accommodation options you and your employees might further explore include:
    • Allowing employees to continue to work remotely even after the campus opens up;
    • Reducing hours of work: 
      • An employee can request a Reduced Period of Responsibility appointment,
      • Schedule vacation and /or lieu time, or
      • Work a flexible schedule with adjusted hours of work, or days of work (including weekends);
        • The ability to take irregular breaks or to work irregular hours so that they can look after children during working hours; 
        • Modifying job duties to allow the employee to work in a position where the disruptions are not problematic, for example, allowing the ability to work in the evening;
        • aking a Protected Leave under the Employment Standards Act, if eligible.

8.5  Personal Travel

  • 8.5.1      Given the unprecedented nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, we encourage staff to limit travel outside the KFL&A region as much as possible throughout the fall term. Some programs will have strict travel restrictions based on clinical teaching units; before making travel plans, please check with the head of your program.

8.6  Equipment to Work from Home 

8.7  Mental Health support

  • 8.7.1      The three federal granting agencies are aware that the rapidly changing situation involving COVID-19 may have an impact on researchers with plans to travel for meetings or other research-related activities. Individuals may decide to cancel trips as a result of various considerations and factors such as cancelled conferences, travel advisories (including those from Health Canada and Global Affairs Canada), or personal choice due to health or other concerns.
  • 8.7.2      The agencies confirm that the reimbursement of non-refundable travel fees from agency funds is acceptable considering the impacts of COVID-19. This applies to the travel of both principal investigators and research personnel, when cancellation occurs as described above.
  • 8.7.3      Note: given the uncertainty of the situation with COVID-19, the agencies suggest that those travelling for agency – funded research consider purchasing either cancellation insurance, or tickets that are at least partially refundable. In this specific situation, some additional cost could still be viewed as economical if it allows for partial or full reimbursement/credit in the event of cancellation.
  • 8.7.4      A list of various mental health services and resources to support staff are listed at http://www.queensu.ca/humanresources/wellness-accessibility/mental-health.
  • 8.7.5      Queen’s Employee and Family Assistance Program (EFAP) provider, Homewood Health, continues to create resources to help employees and family members reduce nervousness and anxiety arising as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Toolkits to success while working remotely are also available for employees and managers.
  • 8.7.6      The Campus Wellness Project encourages and supports a culture of wellbeing for everyone at Queen’s, and continues to do so through their “Digital Campus – WORK” site. Visit the site for links to information, services, support and strategies to support the holistic wellbeing of staff.
  • 8.7.7      Currently Queen’s HR is developing a series of short webinars to help employees deal with the challenges of working in the current environment. These offerings are currently found in HR’s Learning Catalogue and they are working to make each session recording available to all staff and faculty. Visit the Learning & Development web page to learn more about how HR can help you.
  • 8.7.8      Requests for wellness resources or ideas for future topics can be sent to:hrodl@queensu.ca.

9. GLOSSARY

9.1  Mask

  • 9.1.1      A facial covering
    • Please ensure you are wearing the acceptable kind of mask for your work or study.
    • Only Level II Surgical masks are acceptable for clinical placements

9.2  Properly disinfect

  • 9.2.1      Clean
    • Wear reusable or disposable gloves for routine cleaning and disinfection.
    • Clean surfaces using soap and water, then use disinfectant.
    • Cleaning with soap and water reduces number of germs, dirt and impurities on the surface. Disinfecting kills germs on surfaces.
    • Practice routine cleaning of frequently touched surfaces. High touch surfaces include
    • Tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, sinks, etc.
  • 9.2.2      Disinfect
    • Disinfecting is cleaning a surface (using a disinfecting agent) to kill potentially harmful microorganisms.
    • The disinfectant in use is has a Drug Identification Number (DIN), is not expired, and is mixed and applied according to the label instructions, including contact time.

9.3  COVID-19

  • 9.3.1      COVID-19 is an acute viral disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. Individuals infected with COVID-19 can experience the disease with varying levels of severity (ranging from asymptomatic to death). COVID-19 is spread through liquid droplets when an infected individual person coughs, sneezes, or speaks. Non-infected people can become infected by directly breathing in these droplets, or by touching their eyes, nose or mouth after coming in contact with droplets have landed on various surfaces (including tables, doorknobs, and hands). The WHO has deemed COVID-19 a pandemic. Some common symptoms are:
    • Fever (feeling hot to the touch, a temperature of 37.8 degrees Celsius or higher)
    • Chills
    • Cough that's new or worsening (continuous, more than usual)
    • Barking cough, making a whistling noise when breathing (croup)
    • Shortness of breath (out of breath, unable to breathe deeply)
    • Sore throat
    • Difficulty swallowing
    • Runny nose (not related to seasonal allergies or other known causes or conditions)
    • Stuffy or congested nose (not related to seasonal allergies or other known causes or conditions)
    • Lost sense of taste or smell
    • Pink eye (conjunctivitis)
    • Headache
    • Digestive issues (nausea/vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pain)
    • Muscle aches
    • Extreme tiredness that is unusual (fatigue, lack of energy)
    • Falling down often
    • New rash
    • For young children and infants: sluggishness or lack of appetite

9.4  Local officials

9.5  Outbreak (as per Health Canada Guidance for Post-Secondary Institutions)

  • 9.5.1      Institutions are to collaborate with local Public Health to determine how many cases constitute an outbreak.

9.6  Close contact (as per KFL&A Health and Ottawa Public Health Self-Isolation Handout)

  • 9.6.1      A “close contact” is a person who either:
    • lives with someone diagnosed with COVID-19
    • provided care for someone diagnosed with COVID-19, including family members or other caregivers, from up to 2 days (48 hours) before the person with COVID-19 was sick until they started to self-isolate
    • had other similar close physical contact for more than 5 minutes, from up to 2 days (48 hours) before the person with COVID-19 was sick until they started to self-isolate.
  • 9.6.2      Close contacts must self-monitor for symptoms and must self-isolate for 14 days. Symptomatic close contacts will be guided by public health with respect to testing.
  • 9.6.3      Asymptomatic or Surveillance testing in one of your contacts does not apply.

9.7  Transmission spread

  • 9.7.1      Transmission spread, or community-spread, happens when individuals in the community are confirmed positive for COVID-19 but have no known contact with another confirmed case or have not travelled to an area with documented cases.
  • 9.7.2      In order to slow or stop community-spread infections, everyone in our community must continue to practice infection prevention measures including hand washing, mandatory self-isolation for 14 days after returning from travel, and physical distancing. 

9.8  Contact tracing

  • 9.8.1      Contact tracing is a process that is used to identify, educate and monitor individuals who have had close contact with someone who is infected with a virus. These individuals are at a higher risk of becoming infected and sharing the virus with others. Contact tracing can help the individuals understand their risk and limit further spread of the virus.
  • 9.8.2      KFL&A Public Health will perform contact tracing with respect to Queen’s University

9.9  Essential activities

  • 9.9.1      At the onset of the COVID-19 quarantine in March, the province of Ontario ordered the temporary closing of all services unless they performed essential activities. The continuation of these activities is necessary for preserving life, health, and basic societal functioning. These activities are divided into subcategories:
    • Supply Chains
    • Food
    • Services
    • Services to the public that are restricted to alternative methods of sale
    • Financial services
    • Telecommunications and IT infrastructure/service providers
    • Maintenance
    • Transportation services
    • Manufacturing
    • Agriculture and Food Production
    • Construction
    • Resources and energy
    • Community services
    • Research
    • Health and social services
  • 9.9.2      Should the province need to revert to pre-Phase 1 quarantine, the aforementioned businesses and services that provide these activities will remain open.

9.10        Self-isolation

  • 9.10.1   Self-isolation is generally for a period of 14 days from the first onset of symptom(s) from testing or from diagnosis with COVID-19, whichever is earliest, and provided the individual does not have a fever and their other symptom(s) are improving on the fourteenth day. In some cases, public health officials may direct an individual to extend the period of isolation, depending upon symptoms and test results.
  • 9.10.2   Self-isolation means staying at home to avoid situations where you could come in contact with others. Do not leave the house unless to seek medical attention.
    • Do not use public transportation, taxis, or rideshares.
    • Do not go to work, school, or other public places.
    • Only go outside on your own property (e.g., balcony, backyard). When this is not possible, open windows to get fresh air.
    • Reschedule non-essential medical appointments.
    • Do not go grocery shopping or to get other supplies. Instead, have friends or family pick up these items for you, or use delivery services (instruct them to leave items on the front doorstep).
  • 9.10.3   For returning travellers, maintain self-isolation for 14 days after your return. If you are returning from travel outside Canada, you must return directly to your home, do not stop for essentials like groceries or prescriptions.
    • Do not visit your healthcare provider or other clinics without calling first.
    • If you develop symptoms, visit the COVID-19 assessment centre.
  • 9.10.4   During self-isolation you cannot have visitors or visit others during the 14-day self-isolation period.
  • 9.10.5   If you must be in a room with other people (such as those you share a household with), keep a distance of at least 2 metres and wear a mask that covers your nose and mouth.
  • 9.10.6   If you are unable to wear a mask, the other people in your household should wear a mask when you are in the same room.

9.11        Personal Protective Equipment

  • 9.11.1   One element in the hierarchy of controls. Personal protective equipment consists of gowns, gloves, masks, facial protection (i.e., masks and eye protection, face shields or masks with visor attachment) or respirators that can be used to provide a barrier that will prevent potential exposure to infectious microorganisms. (Public Health Canada)

9.12        N95 mask

  • 9.12.1   A disposable, (Note: most respirators used for health care purposes are disposable filtering face pieces covering mouth, nose and chin) particulate respirator. Airborne particles are captured from the air on the filter media by interception, inertial impaction, diffusion and electrostatic attraction. The filter is certified to capture at least 95% of particles at a diameter of 0.3 microns; the most penetrating particle size. Particles of smaller and larger sizes are collected with greater efficiency. The "N" indicates a respirator that is not oil-resistant or oil-proof. N95 respirators are certified by the National Institute for Occupational Health and Safety (NIOSH – organization based in the United States) and must be so stamped on each respirator [National Institute for Occupational Health and Safety (NIOSH). (Public Health Canada)
  • 9.12.2   An N95 mask is not the required PPE for general use on campus.

9.13        Pandemic

  • 9.13.1   A pandemic is a disease that has reached epidemic status in multiple countries and continents. It will affect substantial numbers of people internationally. Pandemics are spread rapidly and exclude international endemic diseases. Declaring an infectious disease as a pandemic entails that significant public health measures should be taken. The World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a pandemic on March 11, 2020.

9.14        Physical distancing

  • 9.14.1   Physical distancing means keeping our distance from one another and limiting activities outside the home.
  • 9.14.2   When outside your home, it means staying at least 2 metres (or 6 feet) away from other people whenever possible.

9.15        Symptomatic

  • 9.15.1   A symptomatic COVID-19 case is a case who has developed signs and symptoms compatible with COVID-19 virus infection. Symptomatic transmission refers to transmission from a person while they are experiencing symptoms. (WHO)

9.16        Asymptomatic

  • 9.16.1   An asymptomatic laboratory-confirmed case is a person infected with COVID-19 who does not develop symptoms. Asymptomatic transmission refers to transmission of the virus from a person, who does not develop symptoms. Asymptomatic transmission does occur; however, it remains unclear if it is a major driver of transmission. According to the WHO, the extent of truly asymptomatic infection in the community remains unknown. The proportion of people whose infection is asymptomatic likely varies with age due to the increasing prevalence of underlying conditions in older age groups (and thus increasing risk of developing severe disease with increasing age), and studies that show that children are less likely to show clinical symptoms compared to adults.
  • 9.16.2   It is important to not conflate asymptomatic cases with pre-symptomatic cases, where the patient has not developed symptoms yet, but eventually will.

9.17        Suspect case (as defined by Public Health Canada – as of July 15, 2020)

  • 9.17.1   A person with symptoms that include two or more of:
    • Fever (signs of fever)
    • Cough (new or exacerbated chronic)
    • Sore throat
    • Runny nose
    • Headache
  • 9.17.2   And meets the exposure criteria OR had close contact with a probable case of COVID-19 (Public Health Canada)

9.18        Confirmed case

  • 9.18.1   A person with laboratory confirmation of infection with the virus that causes COVID-19 performed at a community, hospital or reference laboratory (NML or a provincial public health laboratory) running a validated assay. This consists of detection of at least one specific gene target by a NAAT assay (e.g. real-time PCR or nucleic acid sequencing). (Public Health Canada)

9.19        Probable case

  • 9.19.1   A person (who has not had a laboratory test) with symptoms compatible with COVID-19 AND:
    1. Traveled to an affected area in the 14 days prior to symptom onset; OR
    2. Close contact with a confirmed case of COVID-19; OR
    3. Lived in or worked in a facility known to be experiencing an outbreak of COVID-19 (e.g., long-term care, prison)
  • 9.19.2   OR a person with symptoms compatible with COVID-19 and in whom laboratory diagnosis of COVID-19 is inconclusive (Public Health Canada)

9.20        Occupancy

  • 9.20.1   Occupancy limits refer to the maximum number of people in a building that could safely be accommodated while accounting for physical distancing.

10. FAQ 

  • 10.1        What do I do if a staff/faculty/student gets sick with COVID-19?
    • 10.1.1   As per Section 3.9 - The supervisor/manager must immediately inform Dan Langham, Director Environmental Health and Safety (613-533-6000 x74980, dan.langham@queensu.ca).
  • 10.2        Why are students being required to return to Kingston early?
    • 10.2.1   Students are being required to return to Kingston two weeks early so that they can properly quarantine before the start of school.
  • 10.3        Who does the mandatory 14-day self-isolation period apply to?
    • 10.3.1   ALL Faculty of health sciences students who are returning to campus from anywhere in Canada that is outside the Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox & Addington (KFL&A) region are expected to quarantine in Kingston upon arrival, for 14 days. The faculty’s quarantine requirements differ from the federal requirements and are based on the current circumstances in the KFL&A region. During the quarantine period, students should leave their place of residence only for medical appointments, SARS-CoV-2 testing, picking up takeout food, grocery shopping and independent exercise.
    • 10.3.2   Students who have been living in the KFL&A region for 14 days or more do not need to complete the 14-day quarantine.
    • 10.3.3   Students returning from international travel are required to follow the Government of Canada’s directives for mandatory quarantine.
  • 10.4        Will the FHS be monitoring if students have returned?
    • 10.4.1   No, the FHS will not be monitoring whether students are properly quarantining prior to the start of start. However, it is expected professional behavior for students to return early and properly quarantine.
  • 10.5        What is the difference between quarantine and isolation and when should I do either?
    • 10.5.1   Isolation and quarantine help protect the public by preventing exposure to people who have or may have a contagious disease.
      • Isolation separates sick people with a contagious disease from people who are not sick.
      • Quarantine separates and restricts the movement of people who have potentially been exposed to a contagious disease to see if they become sick.
    • 10.5.2   Quarantine
      • If you have no symptoms and any of the following apply to you, you must quarantine for 14 days (starting from the date you arrive in Canada):
      • Students are being required to return to Kingston two weeks early so that they can properly quarantine before the start of school.
      • you’re returning from travel outside of Canada (mandatory quarantine)
      • you had close contact with someone who has or is suspected to have COVID-19
      • you’ve been told by the public health authority that you may have been exposed to COVID-19 and need to quarantine
    • 10.5.3   Isolate
      • You must isolate if any of the following apply:
      • you’ve been diagnosed with COVID-19, or are waiting to hear the results of a lab test for COVID-19
      • you have symptoms of COVID-19, even if mild
      • you’ve been in contact with someone who has or is suspected to have COVID-19
      • you’ve been told by public health that you may have been exposed to COVID-19
      • you’ve returned from travel outside Canada with symptoms of COVID-19 (mandatory)
  • 10.6        How do I quarantine?
    • 10.6.1   Students are expected to quarantine in Kingston for 14 days, leaving their place of residence only for medical appointments, picking up takeout food, grocery shopping and independent exercise (try and use private transportation if possible). During the quarantine period, students are expected to wear a mask when leaving the house, to maintain physical distancing and refrain from gathering in groups or dining at restaurants or patios.
    • 10.6.2   Stay at home and monitor yourself for symptoms (see Section 3.3), even just one mild symptom.
    • 10.6.3   Avoid contact with other people, especially those who have not travelled or been exposed to the virus to help prevent transmission of the virus prior to developing symptoms or at the earliest stage of illness
      • Do not have visitors.
      • Keep interactions brief
      • Avoid contact with older adults, or those with medical conditions, who are at a higher risk of developing serious illness.
    • 10.6.4   Do your part to prevent the spread of disease by practicing physical distancing in your home
      • Keep at least 2 metres between yourself and the other person
      • If contact cannot be avoided, take the following precautions:
        • Stay in a separate room and use a separate bathroom, if possible
        • Avoid contact with animals, as there have been several reports of people transmitting COVID-19 to their pets.
    • 10.6.5   Some people may transmit COVID-19 even though they do not show any symptoms. Wearing a non-medical mask or face covering (i.e., made with at least two layers of tightly woven fabric, constructed to completely cover the nose and mouth without gaping, and secured to the head by ties or ear loops) if close contact with others cannot be avoided, can help protect those around you.
    • 10.6.6   Keep your hands clean
      • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, and dry with disposable paper towels or dry reusable towel, replacing it when it becomes wet.
      • You can also remove dirt with a wet wipe and then use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol.Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
      • Cough or sneeze into the bend of your arm or into a tissue
    • 10.6.7   Keep surfaces clean and avoid sharing personal items
      • At least once daily, clean and disinfect surfaces that you touch often, like toilets, bedside tables, doorknobs, phones and television remotes.
      • Do not share personal items with others, such as toothbrushes, towels, bed linen, non-medical masks or face coverings, utensils or electronic devices.
    • 10.6.8   Monitor yourself for symptoms
      • Monitor yourself for symptoms, particularly fever and respiratory symptoms such as coughing or difficulty breathing.
      • Take and record your temperature daily (or as directed by your public health authority) and avoid using fever-reducing medications (e.g. acetaminophen, ibuprofen) as much as possible. These medications could mask an early symptom of COVID-19.
    • 10.6.9   Supplies to have at home when in quarantine
      • Non-medical mask or face covering
      • Disposable paper towels
      • Thermometer
      • Running water
      • Hand soap
      • Alcohol-based hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol
      • Dish soap
      • Regular laundry soap
      • Regular household cleaning products
      • Hard-surface disinfectant that has a Drug Identification Number (DIN), or if not available, concentrated (5%) liquid bleach and a separate container for dilution
      • Appropriate cleaning products for high-touch electronics
    • 10.6.10 Things you can do while in quarantine
      • While keeping a physical distance of 2 metres from others, a few things you can do include:
        • greet with a wave instead of a handshake, a kiss or a hug
        • independent exercise
        • go to medical appointments,
        • pick up takeout food with a mask on (and following physical distancing guidelines)
        • go grocery shopping with a mask on (and following physical distancing guidelines)
        • use technology, such as video calls, to keep in touch with family and friends through online dinners and games
        • work from home
        • on your own property only: go outside on your balcony or deck, walk in your yard or get creative by drawing chalk art or running back yard obstacle courses and games
    • 10.7        What should I do if one of my housemates has returned to Kingston from Toronto during my 14-day quarantine period?
      • 10.7.1   Practice proper self-isolation guidelines as detailed in Section 10.6. Maintain physical distance from your roommates (>2 m if possible) and take precautions such as washing your hands often with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer, cleaning frequently touched household surfaces at least once daily, avoiding the use of shared personal items and if possible, using separate bathrooms.
    • 10.8        If I have stayed in Kingston throughout the summer, do I need to quarantine?
      • 10.8.1   No, you do not need to quarantine. 
    • 10.9        If I am not from Kingston, can I stay in my hometown and just get tested when I arrive to Kingston?
      • 10.9.1   No. You must be in Kingston for two weeks prior to the start of your program to quarantine and get the appropriate testing
    • 10.10     Can I continue to work in Kingston if I am studying at the Faculty of Health Sciences in the Fall?
      • 10.10.1   Yes, you can continue to work if you and your employer(s) are practicing all public health guidelines.
    • 10.11     Can family from out-of-town visit us?
      • 10.11.1   As with making travel plans, some programs will have strict restrictions based on clinical teaching units. Students should check with the head of their program before making plans to have family or friends visit. If seeing visitors is permitted, students should practice physical distancing and strictly adhere to all other public health guidelines.
    • 10.12     Can I leave Kingston (e.g. for Thanksgiving or weekends) during clinical studies?
      • 10.12.1   Given the unprecedented nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, we encourage students to limit travel outside the KFL&A region as much as possible throughout the fall term. Some programs will have strict travel restrictions based on clinical teaching units; before making travel plans, please check with the head of your program.
    • 10.13     What do I do if I do not have a place to stay in Kingston before September 1?
      • 10.13.1    Please try to connect with a classmate to see if they have a room not in use. If you cannot find a place, contact your home school.
    • 10.14     If I am from an area where there are no active cases of COVID-19, why would I come to an area like Kingston where students are gathering and the risk is higher?
      • 10.14.1   It is a requirement to return to Kingston despite the higher risk of infection because many aspects of teaching in the FHS cannot be done remotely. Therefore, it is an educational requirement to return to Kingston. Moreover, there is a professional responsibility to return, as FHS provides health professions education. 
    • 10.15     Can cohorts of students move from room to room?
      • 10.15.1   Yes, cohorts of students will be able to move as a group (maximum 6 individuals).
    • 10.16     Who provides PPE?
      • 10.16.1   As per Section 3.11.2, FHS students are responsible for providing their own reusable masks for on-campus activities. The University will provide Staff with two cloth masks that can be picked up in the Queen’s Postal & Print Services (QPPS) office in Fleming Hall, Jemmett Wing, Room 001
    • 10.17     Who is responsible for sanitizing classrooms?
      • 10.17.1   Queen’s University Physical Plant Services will provide cleaning activities in classrooms. These cleaning activities include:
        • Waste removal, cleaning and disinfecting recycling bins (where bins exist in classrooms)
        • Sweeping and picking up of garbage on the floor and disinfecting same
        • Wiping and cleaning of high- surfaces (e.g. vents, chalkboards, whiteboards, etc.)
        • Cleaning of mirrors
        • Vacuuming of carpeted floor
        • Sweeping and mopping of floors
        • Cleaning and disinfecting of counters, tables, and desk tops
    • 10.18     Do I have to run all my non-clinical teaching classroom scheduling plans by central?
      • 10.18.1   Yes, central administration is doing all of the non-clinical teaching classroom scheduling.
      • 10.18.2   To book additional room space, please follow central guidelines here.
      • 10.18.3   Clinical scheduling is being coordinated by Jennifer Saunders, Manager, GSK Clinical Education Centre and SOM Clinical Teaching Centre (jennifer.saunders@queensu.ca).
    • 10.19     Can I send someone home if I think they are sick?
      • 10.19.1   Yes, should an employee or student begin to show the symptoms outlined in section 3.3, they should go home and isolate immediately.
    • 10.20     What is the protocol for an outbreak at Queen’s?
      • 10.20.1   See Section 7.0
    • 10.21     Are there additional sick leave provisions?
      • 10.21.1   Employees who are sick will be treated in accordance with the usual terms, conditions, and processes applicable when they are unable to work due to illness. Queen’s University sick leave policy can be found at: http://www.queensu.ca/humanresources/policies/time-away/sick-leave. Employees are encouraged to contact HR for more information regarding additional sick leave.
      • 10.21.2   Students are to contact their program for more information regarding sick leave provisions.
    • 10.22     How can I support my own and my colleague’s well-being during this time?
      • 10.22.1   As listed in Section 8.0 - Human Resources, there are various mental health services and resources to support staff at: http://www.queensu.ca/humanresources/wellness-accessibility/mental-health.
      • 10.22.2   Moreover, Queen’s EFAP provider, Homewood Health, has various resources and toolkits to help employees reduce anxiety arising as a result of the pandemic.
      • 10.22.3   Currently Queen’s HR is developing a series of short webinars to help employees deal with the challenges of working in the current environment. These offerings are currently found in HR’s Learning Catalogue and they are working to make each session recording available to all staff and faculty. Visit the Learning & Development web page to learn more about how HR can help you.
      • 10.22.4   Requests for wellness resources or ideas for future topics can be sent to:hrodl@queensu.ca.
    • 10.23     Do I still have to pay for parking when I am on campus?
      • 10.23.1   From April to August 2020, the parking fee for Queen’s campus parking was waived. However, the parking charges will be reinstated starting September 1, 2020.
    • 10.24     What if I can’t find child-care in time and need to be on campus?
      • 10.24.1   As per section 8.4, employees with caregiving responsibilities should consult with their managers to see if there are any alternative work arrangements that can be made so that caregiving responsibilities can be met.
    • 10.25     Where can I find the most update to date information about Queen’s policy and procedures during COVID-19?
      • 10.25.1 The most up-to-date information about Queen’s Policy and Procedures during COVID-19 can be found at:
      • 10.26     If I have to cancel work travel due to COVID-19, will I be reimbursed?
        • 10.26.1   As per Section 8.7, the three federal granting agencies confirm that the reimbursement of non-refundable travel fees from agency funds is acceptable considering the impacts of COVID-19. This applies to the travel of both principal investigators and research personnel, when cancellation occurs as described above.
      • 10.27     If there is an outbreak at our teaching hospital, how does this affect Queen’s staff?
        • 10.27.1   It will only affect the Queen’s Staff that work in the teaching hospital. These staff members will be expected followed to hospital protocol.
      • 10.28     What should I do if I don’t have access to the proper technology to work/teach from home?
        • 10.28.1   As per Section 8.6, employees should consult with their managers to discuss what technology can be brought to their home to conduct remote work or teaching.
      • 10.29     How can I access online teaching support?
      • 10.30     How do I notify Queen’s if I am sick or unable to work?
        • 10.30.1   If employees have been on campus and are sick or unable to work because of a suspected case of COVID-19, they are to alert their manager/supervisor, who will immediately inform Dan Langham, Director of Environmental Health and Safety (613-533-6000 x74980, dan.langham@queensu.ca).
        • 10.30.2   Otherwise, the provisions remain the same as standard sick leave policy.
      • 10.31     What are the long-term plans for Queen’s if the pandemic continues beyond Fall 2020?
        • 10.31.1   In this time of uncertainty, Queen’s leadership and administration are meeting regularly and responding to changes as they occur

Appendix A:

Access full document at: https://www.queensu.ca/vpfa/sites/webpublish.queensu.ca.vpfawww/files/files/Return_to_Campus_Guidelines.pdf

Appendix B:

Access at https://www.queensu.ca/vpfa/sites/webpublish.queensu.ca.vpfawww/files/files/Return%20to%20Campus%20Checklist%20-%20Employees.pdf

Appendix C:

Risk Levels[1]

Examples of Characteristics

Examples of clinical teaching activities

Precautions

Engineering & Systems control measures

Administrative Control measures

PPE

Low risk

Activity can be completed while maintaining physical distancing; contact time is limited (

·      Intake interviews

·      Coaching sessions

·      Health teaching sessions

·      Good airflow in the room or space (e.g., windows open)

·      Tape on the floor to mark location of chairs

·      Hand washing stations

·      Cleaning schedules for rooms

·      Education on infection control

·      Active screening upon entering the room

·      Cohorting students

·      Signage

·      Hand washing and sanitizer use protocols

·      None or cloth mask[2] for those who would feel more comfortable having a mask 

Moderate risk

Close, direct contact ≥ 30 minutes; high touch, shared equipment

·      Goniometry

·      Manual muscle testing

·      Supporting ambulation/gait belt

·      Exercise prescription

·      As above, plus: 

o   Cleaning schedules for equipment

o   Equipment set up/Stations (limit student movement)

o   Own equipment (goniometres)

·      As above, plus:

o Equipment stations for single groups

o Equipment cleaning protocols

·      Cloth mask2

High risk

Face-to-face, direct contact ≥ 15 minutes

·      Pivot transfer;

·      Respiratory assessment

·      As above, plus: ?

 

·      As above, plus?

·      Procedure mask and face shield,

·      Gloves as needed for activity

Very high risk

Aerosol generating procedures

None

·      n/a

 

·      n/a

·      n/a



[1] Assuming that the persons involved are not vulnerable (e.g., chronic lung condition… others?)