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Community Health Promotion in action at the H’art School

In the Faculty of Health Sciences, we are always looking to provide our students with opportunities to experience service learning, which is a strategy that integrates meaningful community service with instruction. In the School of Nursing, one of the unique courses that incorporates service learning is Nursing 405: Practicum in Community Health Promotion. Providing hands-on community experience, the course allows nursing students to work in small teams to create and implement a health promotion project that contributes to the work of a community agency and the clients they serve.

An unprecedented CaRMS matching outcome for Queen’s

The outstanding results of the match are a testament to many. To our staff, our residents, our program assistants, every community faculty member who teaches, our university faculty, and our leaders in postgraduate and undergraduate education – you all deserve credit for helping us to achieve excellence in medicine. You have worked so hard for this great outcome.

Living Heart Healthy

Guest blog from Trisha Parsons, Professor at Queen’s University’s School of Rehabilitation Therapy

Building bridges to industry with Paul Lucas

When I became Dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences at Queen’s and began talking about the idea of building partnerships with industry, I realized that I was entering into a divided world. The pendulum, with respect to industry-academic relationships had swung far to the left; communications were not open, relationships were fractured. I knew that bringing that pendulum back to the centre had to be a goal of mine, and yet I knew I couldn’t do it alone.

The SCC’s ruling on assisted death: Where do we go from here?

It has been just eleven days since the Supreme Court of Canada’s (SCC) unanimous ruling to remove the ban on physician-assisted death. This leaves 354 days until the ruling becomes law, at which point our governments, healthcare organizations, educational institutions, and healthcare professionals need to be ready to handle and implement such requests.

Vaccines: what are we teaching our students in the Faculty of Health Sciences?

In light of the media attention this week surrounding vaccines, I thought that this would be an opportune time to expand on what we, in the Faculty of Health Sciences, teach our students about immunization.

In FHS, we deliver education about immunization in our medical school, our nursing school, our school of rehabilitation therapy, our MPH program and in many of our residency programs, such as family medicine, paediatrics and public health & preventive medicine.

Shaving for a cause: med students do Manuary

Here in the Faculty of Health Sciences, I am continually amazed at the extra-curricular work that our students do. Despite the demands of clinical education, our students still find time to give back, dedicating themselves to the causes that they find most important.

Take Vince Wu and Kousha Azimi, both first year medical students, both aspiring otolaryngology/head and neck surgeons. Together with third year student Jennifer Siu and fourth year student Josie Xu, they led the organizing committee of Kingston’s Manuary campaign.

A Report Worth Reading: Promoting Health Innovation in Ontario

Ontario has huge opportunities to become a global leader in health innovation. The Province has six excellent medical schools, 24 research hospitals and serves as the Canadian corporate headquarters for many of the world’s largest health companies. Yet Ontario does not have a strong track record in fostering health innovation.

Treating the whole patient: integrating spirituality and healthcare

In the highly scientific field of healthcare, the concept of spirituality can be uncertain and uncomfortable territory for a practitioner. Not only does the term have several definitions, but often healthcare providers don’t know if, how or when to bring up the concept, let alone integrating spirituality in to a care plan.

Découvertes Médicales en France

The world turned its eyes on Paris and France this week. The unimaginable tragedy of the paired terrorist attacks leaves the world struggling to find answers. It also reaffirmed that the world is united in its resolve against terrorism. In Paris on Sunday, 3.7 million people marched in unity and solidarity.

The attention to France reminds me of the many seminal discoveries that it has given to the world of medicine. Here is just a sample of five such discoveries; five ways in which France has moved the world of biomedical science forward.

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