Skip to main content
2015-16 Dean’s Report: Looking back on a great year

2015-16 Dean’s Report: Looking back on a great year

The 2015-16 Dean’s Report has just been sent to print and will be available both in print and online in the new year. The report serves as a retrospective on the year we’ve had and is full of successes across our three schools. In the interest of giving you a sneak peak, the following are my opening remarks, with mention of some of the stories that you’ll see highlighted in this year’s report.

2016 marks a huge milestone for Queen’s. It is the 175th anniversary of the University, and this year has seen a large number of celebrations across our faculties and many reminders of our rich history as an institution. And this is a very special time for the Faculty of Health Sciences. 2016 marked the 75th anniversary of the School of Nursing, and 2017 will mark the 50th anniversary of the School of Rehabilitation Therapy. Both schools have used their anniversaries as opportunities to hold celebratory events, and to unite alumni around the important work that our schools do in educating health professionals. 

This Dean’s Report marks a much newer anniversary: my fifth report, and the completion of my first term as Dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences. Reflecting back on my time here, much has been accomplished, and it is all thanks to a remarkable group of individuals who make up our faculty, staff and students. 

We have developed and launched 11 new educational programs, from the Queen’s Accelerated Route to Medical School to the continuously growing Master of Science in Healthcare Quality to a graduate diploma, Masters and PhD in Aging & Health. And as you’ll read in this year’s report, the Faculty of Health Sciences has launched a brand new online undergraduate degree: the Bachelor of Health Sciences. 

Despite a challenging research environment in Canada, we have focused on strengthening our research mission. Over the last five years we have seen the establishment of several new research chairs; we have built a clinician scientist recruitment program that led to the recruitment of 11 outstanding clinician scientists; we saw the Canadian Institute for Military and Veterans Health Research become the driving force behind military health research in our country. And as you’ll read in this report, we have seen some of our clinical trials from the Canadian Cancer Trials Group recognized as the best in the world. 

But what I am most proud of is the work that we have done to bring our three schools together. While each school has a distinct mission, five years ago we created a shared vision: In the Faculty of Health Sciences, we ask questions, seek answers, inspire change and advance care. Our three schools now work collaboratively at our executive table, in budget processes, in fundraising and in interdisciplinary programming and we are all better for this great partnership that we have forged. 

I would like to say a special thank you to Jen Valberg for all of her work in putting this year’s report together. I look forward to sharing it with you in the new year.

This will be my last blog post of 2016, and before I sign off, I would like to wish all of you a wonderful holiday and a happy new year. Please share your thoughts and holiday plans by commenting on the blog. And if you would like to drop by the Macklem house, I would suggest waiting until January 3rd….After that, as always, my door will be open.

All my best,

Richard

Fred Moffat

Thu, 06/22/2017 - 12:29

Richard

Congratulations on a job well done! My alma mater is in superb hands!

I hope you’re taking some time with Cheryl and family for yourselves. All’s well down here, I am currently retired from clinical practice for medical reasons, but the folks here at UM are keeping me on in educational and administrative duties for at least a few more years. Surgery has been an endlessly fabulous avocation, the most fun you can have possibly have with your clothes on! Am currently working on a new core curriculum for our SurgOnc fellowship which I have directed for the last 25 years.

Have become very jaded about lectures as an efficient vehicle for learning – within 5 minutes of students’, residents’ and fellows’ posteriors hitting the chair, the only thing they’re seeing is the conjunctival surfaces of their eyelids! Am now using detailed ppts on CDs with multiple choice questions to confirm that they have covered the information, with face to face review to address points of confusion. The ppts come strictly from the peer-reviewed literature (no texts!), and all in all it seems at this very early date to be well received. We’ll see how it goes. In essence, I’ve modeled this on the way you and I prepared for the Royal College exams which we both got through unscathed and with a very good fund of knowledge to support our research, educational and clinical roles. All of this is supported by dialogue sessions in the form of journal clubs, tumor conferences and service conferences as has always been the case. We’ll see how this all turns out.

All our love to you all!

FLM

Fred Moffat

reznickr

Thu, 06/22/2017 - 12:29

In reply to by student

Dera Fred,

So nice to hear from a dear friend and a Queen’s grad. I agree we need to strive to examine alternate models of educational delivery. We are more and more using a “flipped classroom” approach whereby most of the content is delivered, in advance, digitally; reserving valuable classroom time for in depth discussion.

All my love to you and Jenny for the holidays.

Richard

reznickr

Add new comment

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
  • Web page addresses and email addresses turn into links automatically.